Workers tackle the tough jobs

There are a lot of tough jobs out there. In honor of Labor Day, The Democrat is taking a look at a few of Wilson County’s “dirtiest jobs.”
Aug 30, 2014

 

There are a lot of tough jobs out there. In honor of Labor Day, The Democrat is taking a look at a few of Wilson County’s “dirtiest jobs.”

One job that is pretty dirty belongs to the employees of Wilson County Solid Waste. These are the people who deal with the garbage that is tossed into all the trashcans throughout the county.

Citizens from all around Wilson County can stop in at seven locations to dispose of their household garbage, as well as recycle items including televisions and other electronics.

Jeery Harvey has worked at the convenience center on Baddour Parkway in Lebanon for 10 years and said that people bring in all kinds of items, some of which the centers can’t accept.

“People bring in motor oil and paint, construction materials, sometimes yard clippings,” he said.

He said the center stays busy with a constant stream of people. There are two compactors at each site, and Harvey said they are capable of holding anywhere from eight to 12 tons of waste.

“We have [emptied] two a day at times,” he said.

Another “dirty job” can be found at all corners of the county - the construction industry.

Brian Kelley, a superintendent with Gross Builders, said there are any number of jobs in his field that are dirty. He noted the dirtiest was probably the concrete workers.

“The concrete guys get filthy,” Kelley said. He noted that they are covered in concrete dust and can get the wet mixture on their clothes. He also said the brick layers are more often than not covered in mortar.

Even the roofers and drywall experts get covered in sweat and mud.

So where did the holiday originate?

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the holiday was initially created as a dedication to “the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.”

The first Labor Day was celebrated Sept. 5, 1882. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

 

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