Peace Garden to celebrate history

The annual Heritage Peace Garden Celebration is set to take place Saturday with the historic Pickett Chapel serving as the backdrop for the day’s events.
May 16, 2014
(Submitted to The Democrat) Children sit at the base of the cross during the inaugural Heritage Peace Garden Celebration in 2012.

 

The annual Heritage Peace Garden Celebration is set to take place Saturday with the historic Pickett Chapel serving as the backdrop for the day’s events.

Now in its third year, the event will again take place on the grounds of Pickett Chapel, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, located at 209 E. Market St. in Lebanon. 

Festivities will open with ceremonies at 10 a.m. and last through the day until 2 p.m. 

A dedication ceremony that will include tree plantings will be done in memory of Georgia Branch Crutcher, Talitha Charlotte McAdoo and DeFord Bailey.

The day’s events will even include a workday of planting and landscaping a portion of the grounds at Pickett Chapel. This work will be done under the supervision of Justin Stefanski, University of Tennessee Extension Agent for Wilson County, along with Wilson County Gardeners and volunteers.

Archeologist Phillip Hodge will also be in attendance to further explore and explain the archeological potential of the Pickett Chapel site. As the grounds continued to be restored, Hodge’s goal is to continue to identify any archeological remains on the grounds and collect information to help excavations in the future at the chapel.

Several local pastors with ties to Pickett Chapel, including Mike Ripski with Lebanon First United Methodist Church and Michael Ruttlin Sr. with Pickett Rucker United Methodist Church, will also be on hand and participate in the celebration.

A wooden cross stands at the site of the Peace Garden, which was put up in 2012 at the inaugural celebration. 

The community is invited to attend the celebration and no admission will be charged, however donations will be accepted.

Proceeds from the event will go toward funds for matching a grant from the National Parks Service, U.S. Department of the Interior and the Tennessee Historical Commission. These funds and the grant, along with a grant from the city of Lebanon, will help fund the next phase and ongoing efforts in the chapel’s restoration process, which includes the windows, doors, interior stabilization and drainage.

When restoration is complete, the chapel will serve as the site of the Roy Bailey Museum and History Center, so funds raised will also go toward supporting the center.

For more information, call 615-449-2911 or 615-739-2283.

 

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