City traffic citations up so far this year

No one likes to see the dreaded blue lights in their rear view mirror but, according to Lebanon police Chief Scott Bowen, monitoring traffic leads to other crimes detected and solved.
Mar 11, 2013

 

No one likes to see the dreaded blue lights in their rear view mirror but, according to Lebanon police Chief Scott Bowen, monitoring traffic leads to other crimes detected and solved.

Traffic stops are up in Lebanon so far this year, and Bowen said an influx of new officers accounts for the upswing in the number of citations written.

"Traffic citations are up about 400 in the first two months of the year compared to last year," Bowen said. "Part of that can be explained by us having a lot of new officers who are more aggressive about writing citations."
No one likes to see the dreaded blue lights in their rear view mirror but, according to Lebanon police Chief Scott Bowen, monitoring traffic leads to other crimes detected and solved.
Traffic stops are up in Lebanon so far this year, and Bowen said an influx of new officers accounts for the upswing in the number of citations written.
"Traffic citations are up about 400 in the first two months of the year compared to last year," Bowen said. "Part of that can be explained by us having a lot of new officers who are more aggressive about writing citations."
Bowen said it's totally left up to the officer's discretion whether to give a driver a warning or citation.
"It's about 50-50 between citations and warnings," Bowen said. "That's a good balance."
He said officers' flashing blue lights does more than just slow down drivers, it also prevents other crimes when the police have a visible presence in a neighborhood.
"People are less likely to commit a crime when they know the police are around and active," Bowen said, adding traffic stops lead to a lot of other arrests for different offenses.
"Traffic stops lead to arrests for drugs, stolen property," he said. "We've had eight to 10 drug arrests this weekend, and the majority began with traffic stops."
He said the police department, city and state share the proceeds from crime, but that is not the biggest benefit from traffic stops. Bowen said being pulled over for traffic violations are hard for drivers to argue.
"We get very few complaints, because all our stops are recorded," Bowen said.
The chief said the prevention and arrests that stem from traffic stops make it hard to dispute their effectiveness.
"Traffic stops are something we want our people doing," he said. "It's just good police work."

 

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