Some Wilson Countians continue work through Fourth of July festivities

On Thursday many people will be given a day off from work to enjoy the Fourth of July holiday.  Many businesses will close their doors for the day; restaurants, retail stores, and newspapers are just a few types of businesses that plan to give their workers a day of to celebrate. For ...
Jul 2, 2013
 Photo: Gabe Farmer - The Lebanon Democrat

Katie Willoughby is a caregiver at Elmcroft Assisted Living, one of many organizations that will continue to work through the Fourth of July holiday.

On Thursday many people will be given a day off from work to enjoy the Fourth of July holiday. 

Many businesses will close their doors for the day; restaurants, retail stores, and newspapers are just a few types of businesses that plan to give their workers a day of to celebrate. For many others, though, the day will be work as usual.

Many jobs have no place for a day off. Jobs that provide services the community cannot go without for a day must be tended to throughout Independence Day. Roles that care for the sick, provide for the community and deal with emergency situations must remain filled. 

Last year, 21 people died in 17 crashes on Tennessee roadways during the Fourth of July holiday period. Of those 21 deaths, 10 were alcohol related. Emergency crews, such as Lebanon firemen and police officers will work through the night during the Fourth of July holiday to ensure safety on the roadways, as well as responding to firework accidents. 

Tennessee Highway Patrolmen will be out in force from Wednesday through Sunday looking for impaired drivers in an attempt to keep the roadways safe for those celebrating. 

Another of the many fields that will be hard at work Thursday night is those who provide nursing, care and medicine. According to the National Fire Protection Association in 2011, 9,600 people were taken to emergency rooms in the U.S. for fireworks-related injuries. 

Doctors, nurses, and nursing home caregivers in the community will continue their duties of caring for others through the Fourth of July holiday. 

“In a setting like that where the residents’ families are out celebrating, the residents often get left out.” Katie Willoughby, a caregiver at Elmcroft Assisted Living, said of working on the holiday, “Working on a holiday is a reward in itself because the residents truly do appreciate the work that we do for them when they know we could be out celebrating ourselves.”

Not everyone who is working on the Fourth of July will be handling such serious situations as drunk drivers and emergency room visits, though.  With many restaurants closed for the holiday, Wilson County will be full of people barbecuing and grilling to quell their hunger, but when someone burns the hotdogs, spills the tea or forgets the buns, someone is going to have to make a run to the grocery store. Many grocery stores manned with cashiers will keep their doors open throughout the day to accommodate the community’s celebration needs. 

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