Injured animals find comfort in Mt. Juliet

MT. JULIET – The Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in Mt. Juliet takes in and cares for between 500-1,000 injured and orphaned animals each year.  The center is a nonprofit organization locally run by Marty Rush. It has no paid employees and receives no government fundin...
Jul 12, 2013
 Photo: Photo courtesy of Facebook

Tommy the Barn Owl is one of many residents cared for by Marty Rush at Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center.

MT. JULIET – The Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in Mt. Juliet takes in and cares for between 500-1,000 injured and orphaned animals each year. 

The center is a nonprofit organization locally run by Marty Rush. It has no paid employees and receives no government funding, relying solely on donations. 

Rush has rehabilitating animals to prepare them for release back into the wild for 30 years. She has also helped efforts to repopulate eagles in four different areas of Tennessee for the past 27 years. 

Rush created the WRRC not only to rehabilitate animals for release back into the wild, but also to educate the community about the importance of wildlife conservation. Rush has given many presentations on the cause at schools, churches, scout programs and many other organizations throughout Tennessee. She said she's constantly looking for opportunities to educate the public about her passions. 

At WRRC, Rush takes in injured and orphaned animals found throughout the area. Through the use of the facilities, medicine, food and care, the center works rehabilitate the animals they receive to a well-enough level for them to return back into the wild. The animals Rush has rescued include owls, hawks, vultures and crows.

The animals, which live right in Rush’s own backyard, must be fed, given water, cleaned after and given medication each day. Although she occasionally has volunteers help her with her work, Rush said she does a majority of the day-to-day upkeep at the center. 

Rush is always willing to accept donations in the form of volunteer time or money. Anyone who would like to donate items, WRRC is in need of lumber, drywall screws, fencing, railroad ties, cleaning supplies and office supplies. 

Rush may also be contacted to schedule an interactive program to educate groups on the importance of wildlife preservation. She may be reached at 615-758-5231.

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