Low Country Boil a “Shining” Success

As the Harvest Moon, the last one we’ll see until 2017, was shining brightly down on the Cartel Drive location of the annual Low Country Boil, approximately 500 people gathered to eat, drink, bid on objects and raise more than $40,000 for breast and colon cancer Saturday evening.
Oct 5, 2009

 

As the Harvest Moon, the last one we’ll see until 2017, was shining brightly down on the Cartel Drive location of the annual Low Country Boil, approximately 500 people gathered to eat, drink, bid on objects and raise more than $40,000 for breast and colon cancer Saturday evening.
Every year the event for Sherry’s Run and Tennessee Breast Cancer Coalition gets bigger and better and while people wonder what The Shamrock Society, the sponsoring organization can do the next year to top the one before, they manage to do it. This year several circumstances highlighted the affair. For one, Robert Allan Harris, who started the event along with Ed Riley seven years ago, died Sept. 9, 2009, just before the Boil. So this year’s affair was dedicated to Harris, which resulted in two highlighting moments.
During the live auction portion of the evening in the 100-by-40-foot tent set up behind Riley’s house, the last item to be offered for bid was a gorgeous king-size quilt made by Margie Harris, Robert’s widow, and quilted by Melanie Jenkins. Son, Scott Harris, told the story of the creation of the beautiful quilt in his dad’s honor.
Auctioneer Mike Wauford had gotten the bid up to $3,100 and tried desperately to get the competing bidder to go to $3,200. Things came to a stand still for a minute or two and then it was announced the quilt would go to the bidder for $3,100, but another bidder would also write a check for $1,000 in addition to the $3,100. Thus, the loving memory to Harris drew a total of $4,100.
Also added to this year’s affair in honor of Harris was a sky lantern ceremony. According to Chinese lore, sky lanterns are used to release worry and problems and used to honor loved ones. It is considered good luck to release sky lanterns into the air.
On this crisp, clear evening, slightly more than 100 attendees paid $10 a piece and released flame propelled lanterns into the air. What a glorious sight with all those lanterns sailing toward that brightly gleaming Harvest Moon carrying all those thoughts of loved ones. Other folks in town may have looked up at that time and thought UFOs were flying overhead, but those at the Low Country Boil knew the meaning behind the wondrous sight.
The delicious food was prepared by Ed Riley’s Two Fat Men Catering and spread over two houses. At his house was a buffet filled with Italian dishes and flanked by fall decorations. Next door at Bob and Pam Black’s house, their lovely pool area was delightfully covered with Chinese lanterns, fans and bamboo screens and food there consisted of Asian cuisine.
The salad portion of the meal was uniquely served in small Chinese carry out boxes. A dessert tent, featuring country style desserts, like apple pie, along with coffee and hot chocolate, rounded out the food areas.
Music during dinner was furnished by the Jim Beam Distillery band and David Hale from Hawks Specialties kept the music going for dancing after all the other activities.
With tears running down his face, Riley said, “I’m overwhelmed with it all. I can’t believe the number of people that came and how wonderful they all are about bidding on items in the silent and live auction.
“I can’t express our gratitude enough for everyone’s participation and contributions. And our bunch of volunteers, I don’t even know how many we have, but they get in here and work until it’s done. They include my staff at Two Fat Men Catering, all the members of the Shamrock Society and their wonderful wives, and so many other people.
“It takes all of it to make it a success and this year has certainly been a success. I don’t know what we’ll do to top it next year, but we’re already into planning stages. Our eighth annual Low Country Boil will be the first Saturday in October of 2010.”
For more expanded coverage on the Low Country Boil, comments from various attendees and additional pictures, see this Saturday’s Lifestyles section of the Lebanon Democrat.

 

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