Yellow Dots help Wilson County first responders

When a person is involved in a serious car accident, medical history can play a vital role in treatment in the first hour.
Mar 13, 2014

 

When a person is involved in a serious car accident, medical history can play a vital role in treatment in the first hour. 

A new program is designed to help Tennessee first-responders get that information right away.

The state launched the Yellow Dot program with a goal of improved treatment and higher survival rates, according to Shelley Courington, associate state director of advocacy, AARP Tennessee.

“The Yellow Dot program allows folks to put a sticker on their car that says they have information about themselves that could help first-responders, in the glove compartment. This just gives them the information that they need in treating someone at the scene of an accident or a health emergency,” Courington said.

Anyone can take part in Yellow Dot for free, but Courington said it is especially important for those with existing medical issues and those who are older. Currently, more than 1.5 million licensed drivers in Tennessee are 55 and older.
 

The Yellow Dot program was in place for years in a number of other states, and in some counties locally, Courington said. She said the expansion statewide is thanks to a bill that won unanimous approval last year, authored in the House by state Rep. Curtis Halford.

“He learned about it after his wife read about the Yellow Dot program in an AARP publication, and he decided that this was something that made sense for Tennessee. We’re so happy that he had his ear to the ground and wanted to do something for all Tennessee constituents,” she said.
 

There are about two-dozen Yellow Dot enrollment sites across the state. 

Wilson County 911 was approved as a Yellow Dot distribution point in Wilson County. Any Tennessee resident interested in participating in the program can sign up at 1611 W. Main St. in Lebanon on weekdays from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. For more information, visit wilson911.org or call 615-449-7155.

 

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