Low Country Boil raises $28K to fight cancer

A large crowd of people and an additional income of $28,000 raised for Sherry's Run and the Tennessee Coalition for Breast Cancer came through the 10th annual Low Country Boil on Saturday.
Oct 9, 2012
 Photo: Bonnie Bucy
 Photo: Bonnie Bucy

A large crowd of people and an additional income of $28,000 raised for Sherry's Run and the Tennessee Coalition for Breast Cancer came through the 10th annual Low Country Boil on Saturday.
That makes a total of about $280,000 its raised during the past 10 years.
“Our numbers were down just a bit this year,” said Bob Black, treasurer of the event and one of the original Shamrock Society members. “I'm sure the cold weather and rain predictions kept a lot of people from coming out. It's also the first time since we started the boil that we've had so many things going on at the same time in Lebanon and Wilson County. Next year will be bigger and better.”
Members, wives and friends of the sponsoring Shamrock Society worked to the utmost to prepare for the threatening cold and rainy weather that was predicted to move into Lebanon.
In addition to the food service, dining tables and bar, auction items and music stage, organizer Ed Riley also moved heaters under the big tent.
According to Riley, it all worked. As the crowd began arriving even before 6 p.m., comments could be heard about how nice and warm it was and how great everything looked.
The usual 40-feet long table featuring silent auction items centered the tent and was flanked on each side by tables and chairs and a bar site. A stage sat in a front corner where music was performed during the evening. A display of live-auction items, including a luxury cabin in Lake Tahoe, a 3-carat diamond ring, handgun, fire pit and dinner for eight at Mo'Cara Restaurant with wine tasting, was posted for viewing.
Silent-auction items included several styles of jewelry, a studded evening bag, paintings, books, several wines – including a basket from Frank Stallone, quilts, a Santa cookie jar, painting lessons for 10 at the Art Mill and a ceramic, a 2-feet tall ceramic rooster that brought about a bidding “war” that had several potential buyers competing, plus many other items.
As the guests approached the serving area, they were met by a tall pumpkin scarecrow whose arms, legs and middle section were composed of candied and caramel apples and huge marshmallows on sticks – which along with fried donuts – were desserts waiting to be “picked.”
Lining both sides and the back of that tent were trays and bowls of red beans and rice with sausage, baked chicken, fresh shrimp with cocktail sauce, pasta salad, corn casserole, red potatoes, and breadsticks. The bar handled beer, wine, punch and water to drink.
After everyone had eaten and gone back for seconds, Mike Walker conducted the live auction.

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