Local hospital home to first robotic hip replacement

University Medical Center became the first facility in Middle Tennessee last month to perform a total hip replacement using a new robotic arm system. Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Jon Cornelius performed the MAKOplasty robotic surgical procedure Jan. 17 on a female patient. “She did ...
Feb 19, 2013
 Photo: Submitted to The Democrat

Dr. Jon Cornelius

 

University Medical Center became the first facility in Middle Tennessee last month to perform a total hip replacement using a new robotic arm system.

Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Jon Cornelius performed the MAKOplasty robotic surgical procedure Jan. 17 on a female patient.

“She did very well with her surgery,” Cornelius said. “I have seen her a couple of times now.”

MAKOplasty is a minimally invasive treatment option for adults living with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis. The procedure is less invasive than traditional total hip replacement surgery and is performed using RIO, a highly advanced, surgeon-controlled robotic arm system. University Medical Center is the first and only hospital to acquire this technology in Middle Tennessee.

“I think it is exciting because anyone who needs a total hip replacement can get one using this procedure,” Cornelius said.

MAKOplasty potentially offers reduced pain, minimal hospitalization, more rapid recovery, less implant wear and loosening, smaller scar, and better range of motion as benefits to the traditional total hip replacement surgery.

MAKOplasty is also used for partial knee replacement surgery, also performed by Cornelius at University Medical Center. Cornelius said he started the knee replacement surgeries about 18 months ago and has performed about 60 since then.

“I average one per week, but there were some weeks I did four to six a week,” Cornelius said.

By comparison, he said the knee replacements are more challenging than the hip replacements, but he’s confident both procedures are far superior than traditional methods.

“From a technical standpoint, I think the knee is more difficult because the technique is different,” Cornelius said. “The benefit with the hip is less dissection and faster recovery.

“I think it’s great that we are bringing people from other communities to our community for these surgeries. It’s good for them, and it’s good for the hospital.”

University Medical Center is a 245-bed, two-campus acute health care facility with more than 230 physicians on staff. The hospital has about 800 full- and part-time employees and is the sole provider of health care service in Wilson County.

 

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