Sara's Column: So many shows, so little time.

A couple weeks ago, I started combing through the television networks’ fall lineups to find out when my favorite shows were slated to premier.
Sep 26, 2013

A couple weeks ago, I started combing through the television networks’ fall lineups to find out when my favorite shows were slated to premier.

I only follow a few shows, so I figured it would be a fairly quick process.

Well, as I scrolled through the listings, all these new shows kept catching my attention.

So of course I had to read up on them.

My “fairly quick process” turned into a three-hour endeavor, which was especially unfortunate considering I began it at about 1 a.m.

Now, I know there are still only 24 hours in a day, so they haven’t likely added time slots, but for some reason it feels like there are so many more shows airing this season.

As I started scheduling series recordings on my DVR, I realized I’ll have to be a lot more conscientious about deleting shows as I watch them – forget for three weeks with four shows, and it’s not too bad; forget for three weeks with a dozen shows, and it might get cagey.

Yes, I actually have more than a dozen shows on my watchlist.

While I’m sure that number will eventually dwindle slightly as I lose interest in shows that now seem intriguing, I also know that I barely had time to follow three shows when the seasons ended in May.

My schedule hasn’t changed much since May; if anything, it might be a bit more hectic.

As someone who has never been what one would call a “television junkie,” it’s a strange experience for me. I find myself torn between spending those precious few hours of free time reading a book or spending that time watching a show.

And as of this season, it’s gotten worse.

As I counted down the days to the “Castle” season premier, I finally understood what it is to be a “television junkie.”

And while the bibliophile in me ducks slightly in shame, another part of me sees the sense in it.

Most television shows are just stories conveyed in a specific medium.

Sounds kind of like a book, huh?

The heart of a good book is a good story, and the heart of a good television show is a good story. And while I will be the very last person to discount the educational enrichment that can be offered from reading a good, well-written book, I also believe a good, well-written television show can greatly enrich a person.

It boils down to one word – imagination.

Whatever helps at least one person think beyond the realm of possible and start to consider the impossible deserves at least a modicum of respect.

I’ve been known to dismiss television at times – I went for years without ever watching it – but I will gladly now admit the error of my ways.

Now if only I can find more hours in the day.

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