Hannah Barger: End-of-the-school year pick-me-ups

With the end of the school year fast-approaching, high school students are bombarded with a nearly indescribable (and much less than awesome) mixture of feelings: excitement, apathy, and stress.
May 13, 2014
Hannah Barger

With the end of the school year fast-approaching, high school students are bombarded with a nearly indescribable (and much less than awesome) mixture of feelings: excitement, apathy, and stress. I thought it was impossible to feel all three at once, but I was, and as I so often find myself to be these days, sorely mistaken. If you’ve ever had to deal with end-of-term angst (senior-related or otherwise), you know what I’m talking about. However, you needn’t suffer in silence. You could suffer loudly. Or you could follow these tips. 

Movie breaks

I’ve talked about movies enough using this column as a platform that if I said I was taking the CEO of Netflix to the prom, you’d probably believe me. But aside from being a cheap and easy hobby, watching movies has played a huge role in keeping me sane these past few weeks. Nothing compares to a good documentary, a cheesy low budget sci-fi, or what my pals at Netflix call a “gritty drama.” If finals and good old-fashioned “who cares” disease are getting you down, sit down. Sit down in front of the computer or the TV and watch something you love. You can thank me later. 

Walking

Going outside, picking a direction, and going for it not only has the obvious health benefits our gym teachers are so crazy about, but the added effect of raising your mood by at least a point and a half. Long walks improve your imagination as well, and it’s not hard to see why, with all the nature and animals and such - how majestic. Plus, with the added benefit of headphones, you’ll feel like you’re in a movie - bonus points for you! Unless, of course, it’s hot. In that case, all bets are off. 

Crafts

I am by no means the greatest craftswoman of my generation, but I can attest to the fact that the satisfaction of finishing a project - even one as small as making a friendship bracelet - is one of the best feelings in the world. Even if it turns out horribly, it’s your horrible thing, and you made it on your own. Even if the only thing in the world you’ve got control over is that poorly-knitted scarf or wonky picture frame, you’ve got something to be proud of.

Hannah Barger is a senior at Wilson Central High School and plans to study journalism at Tennessee Tech University in the fall. 

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