Kimberly Jordan: Laughter may just be best medicine in tough times

I’ve grown up hearing the phrase “laughter is the best medicine” so many times I could never count them. But I think there is some truth to those words.
Jul 10, 2014
Kimberly Jordan

I’ve grown up hearing the phrase “laughter is the best medicine” so many times I could never count them. But I think there is some truth to those words.

Something I have noticed about myself recently is that almost every time I get stressed or confused, I will just start making random jokes or saying ridiculous things to keep my mind off the situation. 

Laughing can diffuse tension, and goodness knows there are plenty of situations that need that.

Also, as a writer, of course I have to type a lot. When you go through the amount of copy that most of us do, you make mistakes. Everybody does it, we’re all human right? Unless there are any cyborgs reading this column right now (Arnold Schwarzenegger, I’m talking to you). I proved my own point by misspelling his name twice to finish that sentence.

I was joking with a coworker the other day because I typed “you have me number right?” instead of “my number.” I told her I thought I’d turned into a leprechaun for a minute there. She laughed her head off. Sometimes you just have to know when to laugh, even at yourself.

I read on a website Wednesday that has a Ph.D. quoted as saying “Your sense of humor is one of the most powerful tools you have to make certain that your daily mood and emotional state support good health.”

I would agree with that wholeheartedly.

I’ll be the first to say that there are days that I get so stressed out that I can’t focus. So, what do I do on those days you might ask? I go find a humorous story on the web, or try to find a funny photo. Sometimes I’ll play snippets from a comedian that I have on my iPod.

I also had to think about the number of times other people in my office ask me to proofread their copy. It amazes me that I can spot mistakes in someone else’s writing, but my own writing comes out completely ridiculous some days. 

I guess it’s that old adage that your brain knows what you meant to say, so it reads things the way you meant to write them. I get laughed at by people who think that me reading my own stories from the bottom up helps me catch mistakes. 

I don’t mind them laughing. If it makes their day a little more bearable, more power to them. I know the method works, so I just do it anyway.

Whatever makes you laugh, try to find time to enjoy it. It might just keep you sane in this insane world.

Kimberly Jordan is The Democrat’s general assignment reporter. Email her at kjordan@lebanondemocrat.com or follow her on Twitter @wilsonnewsroom.

 

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