New Leash on Life goes above, beyond for animals

It’s been said dogs are man’s best friend. Certainly dogs and other animals kept as pets are dependant on people to provide food, water, shelter, veterinary care and, most importantly, love.
Oct 2, 2013

It’s been said dogs are man’s best friend. Certainly dogs and other animals kept as pets are dependant on people to provide food, water, shelter, veterinary care and, most importantly, love. 

When it comes to providing a loving home for animals that might not have gotten the best of starts in life, New Leash on Life is often the answer in Wilson County. 

Recently, a Kentucky woman pleaded guilty to animal cruelty and surrendered 22 dogs, four cats and one of two parrots seized in a Sept. 19 raid initiated by Animal Rescue Corps with New Leash on Life volunteers assisting. 

In addition, ARC also assisted authorities in Ohio County, Ky., where more than 50 dogs were found at a property of a known hoarder and convicted animal abuser, according to ARC officials.

All of the animals involved were housed in Lebanon as New Leash on Life took the lead in caring for them until custody could be determined and adoptions could begin. 

“We couldn’t do this scale of operation without the cooperation of our partners. It truly takes all of us working together to end suffering of this scale,” said Animal Rescue Corps President Scotlund Haisley. “Animal Rescue Corps and our partners stand united in a commitment to helping these animals and bringing an end to puppy mills.”

ARC’s network of placement partners, which includes New Leash on Life, will be tasked with finding permanent homes for all of the animals which were cared for by teams of volunteers working around the clock for the past week in a temporary emergency shelter set up at Cumberland Valley Shows warehouse in Lebanon.

“Having come from a puppy mill, these animals all have special needs,” said New Leash on Life Director Amy Haverstick. “They will need foster and adoptive parents who have the patience and knowledge to teach them how to live as family members for the first time.”

For all the work by these faithful New Leash on Life volunteers to care for these animals that are unable to care for themselves, it takes donations of money and supplies. Imagine for a moment how much food alone it would take to feed more than 150 animals for even a day. 

Then, factor in the assistance and special attention needed for these neglected animals found in deplorable conditions. 

All the time, but especially now, New Leash on Life depends on the community’s help to do this important work. 

After all, if New Leash on Life doesn’t take on the challenge, who would? Let’s hope this question goes unanswered for a long time. 

Comments

Hayes1210

I live in Watertown TN. I am so upset to hear that New Leash On Life will lose funding. They helped a neighbor and myself with cats and kittens that were abandon by a home owner after house was foreclosed on. There was about 20 kittens and 5 female cats. They fixed and spayed the adult cats and fixed some of the kittens that were left owner that owned house was cited by City of Watertown to do something with the animals or pay a fine, so he threw a bunch of cat's and kittens in boxs and there is no telling were he dumped the animals, he didn't even care if the kittens were with the mother cat or not. This litter was the third generation of cats I told them about New Leash on Life for spaying he said he knows but he would not due anything about it.

 

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