New Leash on Life becomes advocate again

We hear from time to time about advocates working on behalf of children – those who do not have the means or the capacity otherwise to defend or support themselves on their own. There are quite a few entities that serve that purpose.
Feb 20, 2014

We hear from time to time about advocates working on behalf of children – those who do not have the means or the capacity otherwise to defend or support themselves on their own. There are quite a few entities that serve that purpose. 

When it comes to animals, more specifically those kept as pets, the notion is quite the same for many to protect and shield them from harm and potential wrongdoing. Unfortunately the numbers dwindle significantly from child advocates compared to animal advocates. 

That’s where New Leash on Life enters the scene ready to help in any way it can. During the weekend, 73 dogs and two cats were rescued from a home in Hamblen County. 

Now, they are Lebanon residents. Formerly a warehouse used as shelter for Wilson County Fair rides, the location owned by the Floyd family now a temporary shelter for these distressed animals in need. The location on Carver Lane has served as a shelter in the past, as well, when animals were in need of help. 

New Leash on Life Director Amy Haverstick said the conditions “were awful” in the home. Animal Rescue Corps spokesperson Michael Cunningham said the animals were housed in a two-bedroom, one-bath home, and several of the animals were in cages that were wired shut.

“The wire on those cages had completely rusted; you could tell those animals had never left those cages,” he said.

Cunningham said all of the animals went through full medical evaluations Sunday and many were being treated for worms or mange. Two puppies were diagnosed with parvo and were under treatment.

Once the animals have been treated and evaluated for any aggression toward humans, other dogs or with food, they will be available for adoption, according to Cunningham.

“The owner did a full surrender of the animals. Some will go into foster homes while they recover from injuries, and the others will go to area shelters and rescue groups to be adopted out,” he said.

Thank goodness both the Animal Rescue Corps and New Leash on Life are here to serve as advocates to these animals in the past, as well as now and in the future. 

These volunteers work tirelessly because the animals they help cannot help or defend themselves. 

We owe them a debt of gratitude. 

Log in or sign up to post comments.