• Matt Masters: Living in the past doesn’t stop the future

    By Matt Masters -

    Everybody wants the world they first came to know, with all its flaws and trials. It’s seemingly so much better than the unknown tomorrow brings, but all we’ve got is the present. The world is changing, with or without us, and sometimes because of us.

    There’s a lot of talk around the county and in similar communities throughout the country about where we came from, where we are and where we’re going.

    Everybody wants a good job, good schools, entertainment close by, no traffic, no crime and no skyscrapers, billboards, jails, power stations or water treatment plants in their backyards. 

    The truth is, no one can stop growth, regardless of whether that growth equals progress. 

    Land is limited and will only grow in value, and in the 21st century, we have to face the fact that there is almost nothing left to discover on this planet. There is no promised land to tame. As we face the challenges of climate change, what resources we do have will become increasingly volatile and needed.

    Now, if I’ve lost you by writing “climate change,” then I guess you can just turn the page. 

    If you’re still reading, the point is that we can’t go back in time. While we should do is our best to preserve nature, farmland, history and culture. We have to remember that some of these – specifically culture – cannot be preserved. It is as alive as the people who make up that culture. 

    Small towns will either grow or die, and in a world that is overpopulated, maybe we’d all do better to face the challenges of growth with innovation and excitement for the future. What other choice do we really have? At the end of the day, living in the past doesn’t stop the future.

    Matt Masters is a staff writer for The Democrat. Email him at [email protected] and follow him on Twitter @wilsonnewsroom.

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