The 2020 deer archery-only hunting season opens statewide in Tennessee on Saturday, Sept. 26. The archery-only season dates are the same statewide Sept. 26-Oct. 30 and Nov. 2-6. You can use archery equipment at any time during the statewide deer season that runs through Jan. 3, 2021.

There are ample opportunities for deer hunters in Tennessee looking for public land to hunt. There are more than 100 wildlife management areas and refuges across the state open at various times for hunting. Find area specific regulations at eregulations.com/tennessee/hunting/. Hunters are reminded that they must possess the appropriate licenses and permits. Specific regulations and license requirements do apply. Private lands are also available for hunting. For hunting on private land, hunters must obtain permission from landowners.

The 2020-21 Tennessee Hunting and Trapping Guide contains all the information for hunters. Guides are available where hunting and fishing licenses are sold and on the TWRA website, tnwildlife.org, and the TWRA On the Go app.

The antlerless deer bag limits for the archery-only season are four in Units A-D and three per day in Unit L and Unit CWD. The antlered deer bag limit is a total of two for the entire 2020-21 deer seasons.

Also, Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s Hunters for the Hungry program is now accepting deer donations for the 2020 deer season. More than 60 deer processors across the state are accepting donations of deer to feed Tennessee families in need.

To see processors currently participating, visit tnwf.org/processors.

“Because of COVID-19, more Tennesseans than ever are having to rely on hunger relief organizations to help feed their families,” said Matt Simcox, Hunters for the Hungry manager. “That’s why we want to encourage even more hunters to donate their harvest this season. Each time they donate a deer, they’re providing 168 meals to our neighbors who need it most.”

When hunters harvest a deer, they may donate it at a participating processor. The venison is processed and then provided to community food banks or soup kitchens.

Since the program began, Hunters for the Hungry has provided more than 7.6 million meals to hungry Tennesseans.

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